WHF Roadmap to the Management and Control of Raised Blood Pressure

Category: Raised Blood Pressure Country: Worldwide Created by: WHF Roadmaps Recommended: 0

Roadmap Overview

WHF has developed this roadmap on Raised Blood Pressure with experts and its members to focus on and help identify the roadblocks to treating hypertension, which are currently preventing the 25by25 targets being achieved. This roadmap offers evidence based solutions which may be applicable to achieving an improved management of hypertension.

Challenges

A key challenge in effective raised blood pressure control
is that most hypertensive individuals are usually asymptomatic for years prior to a significant cardiovascular event, but face an increased risk
of stroke, heart attacks, and kidney disease. Raised blood pressure is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in primary care and, left untreated, can lead to a range of complications including myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, renal failure and death (WHO, 2013). Despite international efforts to control the disease, its prevalence continues to rise, increasing from 600 million in 1980 to 1 billion in 2008 (WHO 2011).

Target

A relative reduction of the prevalence of raised blood pressure by 25 percent
(WHO 2013) by 2025. 


Definition

According to the GBD, ischemic heart disease is one of the biggest causes of morbidity and mortality across the world (Murray 2013). Annually, there are over 17 million deaths due to cardiovascular disease worldwide, of which 9.4 million are attributed to raised blood pressure (WHO 2013). Complications of raised blood pressure account for 45% of all heart disease deaths and 51% of all stroke related deaths (WHO 2013). Blood pressure has a continuous relationship with the incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, and end stage renal disease. Trials show that lowering blood pressure reduces the risk of subsequent cardiovascular events (WHO 2007), including a 35-40% reduction in the risk of stroke and a 20-25% reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction (Collins et al., 1994, BPLTTC 2003; Law, 2009). Raised blood pressure is either defined as blood pressure at or over 140 mmHg systolic or 90 mmHg diastolic
or as receiving drug therapy for raised BP regardless which are their blood pressure values. Individuals considered to have “high normal” BP are defined as those with a systolic BP between 130-139 mmHg &/or diastolic BP between 80 and 89 mmHg.

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WHF Roadmap to the Management and Control of Raised Blood Pressure

Category: Raised Blood Pressure Country: Worldwide Created by: WHF Roadmaps Recommended: 0

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WHF roadmap published on Global Heart.